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Passion Creates Brand Advocates

This is an excerpt from David Lorenz’s chapter in “The GM’s Handbook” which is available in paperback, Amazon Kindle and Kindle Unlimited. It is cited, indexed and professionally edited, providing perspectives from 16 MiLB C-Suite Executives on leadership, hiring/firing/interviews, merchandise, tickets, concessions, corporate sales and the business of sports revenue generation.

 

Passion Begets Passion

Whether I am selling group tickets or a corporate package, it is the passion that I bring to the table that helps me thrive by the end of the day. When you have a product that you believe in, when you love what you do, it shows in the product that you are selling. The client feels that energy from you too. They know when someone half-believes in their product, or doesn’t really care about it at all. That’s why every day, no matter how I might be personally feeling, I put those emotions aside to sell the product the best way that I know how. And that’s with so much passionate energy that the client knows that I believe in this product as much as they should.

GMsHandbook
Discover the rest of this chapter and more, in “The GM’s Handbook,” a new 390-page book available now in paperback, Amazon Kindle and Kindle Unlimited. It is cited, indexed and professionally edited, providing perspectives from 16 MiLB C-Suite Executives on leadership, hiring/firing/interviews, merchandise, tickets, concessions, corporate sales and the business of sports revenue generation.

My first professional sports sales job in minor league baseball was all about my passion and energy. My first day working for the Chattanooga Lookouts is probably different than the person reading this. Mine started January 15, 1995 after driving all-night to Chattanooga, Tennessee, arriving at the ballpark around noon. My excitement carried me through the first day that I started. I was welcomed by the staff with open arms, and looked forward to starting my career in minor league baseball.

The training that I received consisted of showing me that my office was inside the Engel Stadium press box. It was complete with a phone book and telephone. And I was told to start selling group tickets. That was all my training consisted of. But my energy and passion for working in the industry that I love took hold. I didn’t complain about where my office was, or what I was told to do. And I wouldn’t have had it any other way. I realized that earning my stripes, learning to sell, and striving to be the best at selling the product that I loved would show through because of the passion that I exuded from the first day.

That entire summer had me working alongside two other interns who were also making group sales calls. We started feeding off of each other in a friendly, competitive manner. We pushed each other on goals, attempting to see who could make the most group ticket sales. To this day, I still have great friends who came from that Chattanooga experience. That first year in minor league baseball was the best year of my life. Because I was selling a product that I believed in, and loved. I still won’t forget Opening Day 1995, during batting practice, where I was continuing to paint the outfield signs while constantly wondering if I would be clocked by a fly ball hitting the back of my head. I still wouldn’t trade that memory for anything.

That summer was about learning who I truly was within the sports industry. I believe that 1995 defined me as a minor league baseball sales professional because I was open to the suggestions on how to grow in my job, and I haven’t stopped learning since. I didn’t have my sales “wrap” down pat yet, nor did I use a sales script. But I was willing to learn, especially from the two interns who sat beside me in the Engel Stadium press box that summer, and I developed my own style of selling. It’s about fostering a belief in building a personal rapport with my clients, while listening to their wants and needs, that allows me now to supply them with a proposal that they will love. Mainly because I love the product enough to believe in selling it.

 

Discover the rest of this chapter and more, in “The GM’s Handbook,” a new 390-page book available now in paperback, Amazon Kindle and Kindle Unlimited. It is cited, indexed and professionally edited, providing perspectives from 16 MiLB C-Suite Executives on leadership, hiring/firing/interviews, merchandise, tickets, concessions, corporate sales and the business of sports revenue generation.

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